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Bloodborne Pathogens: Qquestion and Answer by (NHCPS)


Bloodborne Pathogens: Qquestion and Answer by (NHCPS)


Which item below is not an example of a bloodborne pathogen?
 HIV
 Hepatitis B
 Hepatitis C
 *All of the above are bloodborne pathogens
CORRECT

John sneezed after a nose bleed, and some blood spattered onto the table and floor. What is the first thing you should do?
 Report the incident to your supervisor
 Give John absorbent towels to help with his nose bleed
 *Protect yourself with personal protective equipment
 Wipe up the blood from the table and floor
CORRECT

You have just removed your gloves after cleaning up some blood. What should you immediately do next?
 Go to the break room for some water
 Go back to work
 *Wash your hands
 Go get something to eat
CORRECT

Where should you dispose of any sharps?
 Recycling bin
 Trashcan
 *Labeled sharps container
 Toilet
CORRECT

True or False: You should only report an incident if you feel sick afterwards.
Your Answer: False

CORRECT
True or False: If you come into contact with a bloodborne pathogen, you will get sick.
Your Answer: FALSE

CORRECT
True or False: You can spread a bloodborne illness if you are exposed to one, even if you are not showing symptoms.
Your Answer: True

CORRECT
Which is a symptom of Hepatitis B and C?
 Jaundice
 Fatigue
 Abdominal Pain
 *All of the above
CORRECT

Which is a symptom of HIV?
 Fatigue
 Changes in Appetite
 Swollen glands
 *All of the above
CORRECT

Which is the correct order for responding to a bloodborne pathogen exposure? I. Act Immediately II. Tell Your Supervisor III. Protect Yourself IV. Clean the Area
 I, III, II, IV
 I, II, III, IV
 *III, I, IV, II
 II, III, IV, I
CORRECT

True or False: When removing gloves, you should avoid touching the external face of the glove.
Your Answer: True

CORRECT
True or False: You should never try recapping sharps.
Your Answer: True

CORRECT
True or False: If the injured victim has a latex allergy, you may still use latex gloves if none other are available.
Your Answer: False

CORRECT
Jane Doe is admitted with fatigue, vomiting and cyanosis. What type of illness might she have?
 Hepatitis B
 Hepatitis A
 Graves’ disease
 *None of the above
CORRECT

Who may come into contact with sharps?
 Disposal workers, nurses and kitchen staff only.
 Managers, visitors, patients and nurses only.
 Disposal workers, other patients and nearby business workers.
 *Other patients, disposal workers, sanitation workers, employees and everyone present where the sharps container goes.

CORRECT
What can happen if you recap sharps?
 A. Your facility may be praised for outstanding infection control and prevention.
 B. You could accidentally poke yourself.
 C. You could be exposed
 *D. B and C
CORRECT

Jane Doe accidentally splashes urine from a bedside commode into your face and eyes. What should you do immediately?
 Take a sample of urine from the bedside commode for testing.
 Scold her for splashing bodily fluids on you.
 *Immediately flush face and eyes with copious amounts of water and seek medical attention.
 Nothing if there is not any blood in the urine.
CORRECT

You arrive on the scene of a traffic accident. Two of the victims are unconscious and in cardiac arrest. What can you do to best prevent exposure to bloodborne pathogens while providing emergency care?
 Wear a “mouth guard.”
 Wear gloves.
 Wear personal protective equipment.
 *Follow and use the information in your bloodborne pathogens training course.
CORRECT

How often is training for bloodborne pathogens required?
 Every month.
 Once every five years.
 *Every year.
 Upon exposure to bloodborne pathogens.
CORRECT

How long can bloodborne pathogens survive outside of the body, and how do you know it is safe to touch dried blood or bodily fluids?
 Indefinitely; any type of dried blood can be immediately touched without personal protective equipment.
 *Depends on the specific pathogen; any type of dried blood or bodily fluids should always be considered hazardous for the purposes of exposure control.
 Two hours; dried blood can be touched without gloves after two weeks for the purposes of exposure control.
 Up to two weeks; any dried blood or bodily fluid-containing items should always be considered hazardous for the purposes of exposure control.
CORRECT

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